Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

ChristianaCare offers monoclonal antibody treatment (mAb), Bebtelovimab, to help those at high risk of complications from COVID-19

Your body naturally makes antibodies to fight infection. However, your body may not have antibodies designed to recognize a new virus like the one that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies are made in a laboratory to fight a particular infection based on natural antibodies against COVID-19. The mAb treatment can help patients who are at high risk for severe symptoms or hospitalization from COVID-19. In addition, they can help shorten the course of illness from COVID-19 and prevent hospitalization.

Monoclonal antibodies are not a cure for COVID-19.


This investigational treatment is not authorized for use in patients:

  • who are hospitalized due to COVID-19; or
  • who need oxygen therapy due to COVID-19; or
  • who need increased oxygen due to COVID-19 or who are on chronic oxygen therapy due to a non-COVID-19 health problem.

Frequently Asked Questions

Monoclonal antibodies are made in the lab to help your body fight COVID-19. They are not a cure, but they may help keep your symptoms from becoming more serious and they may help shorten the amount of time you are sick from COVID-19. This therapy is authorized for emergency use only by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) but it hasn’t been approved yet.

Eligible patients must have tested positive for COVID-19 and within seven days from the start of symptoms.

This medication is currently being provided at our specialty infusion center at ChristianaCare’s Newark campus. You can not get this therapy in the emergency department, in clinics or if you are already in the hospital with COVID-19. If your provider is within ChristianaCare, they can place a referral to activate the process. If your provider is not within ChristianaCare or you would like to make a self-referral as a patient, then please call 302-428-2121 and select provider option 1 for referrals.

We are working hard with our medical providers to identify people at highest risk and make sure it goes first to those who need it most.

The treatment is given as an infusion (through the veins). This is followed by one hour of observation for your safety.

Monoclonal antibody therapy is still being studied, so it is possible that not all of the risks are known at this time. Talk with your health care provider to make this decision. The Center for Virtual Health will monitor patients through our secured texting platform before and after the infusion.

There is no cost for the supply of monoclonal antibodies, however there may be administration costs for providing the infusion depending on your specific health insurance policy.