Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Gynecology Oncology Research

The Body as its Own Best Defense

Extending the Boundaries

Graham Cancer Center gynecologic oncologists are collaborating with a research team at Wistar’s Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program focusing on new plasma and tissue biomarkers to improve early diagnosis and clinical management of epithelial ovarian cancer. Philanthropic support will allow researchers to translate this bench research into new therapies and biomarkers used at the patient’s bedside.

Improving detection and treatment at the molecular level

More than 22,000 women will be newly diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year. Notoriously difficult to detect, ovarian cancer is typically not diagnosed until it has reached an advanced stage. Under the expert guidance of gynecologic oncologists Mark Borowsky, M.D., Mark Cadungog, M.D., and Stephanie Jean, M.D., ChristianaCare’s Translational Cancer Research Program in ovarian cancer is focused on advancing research in ways to identify targets that will outsmart ovarian cancers on a molecular and personalized level. Previous philanthropic support has allowed us to jump-start the program by creating a biorepository of diverse tissue samples for basic bench research. Through tumor molecular profiling and DNA sequencing, the researchers are able to identify and understand different mutations, leading to new treatment options and earlier detection options.