ChristianaCare

Health & Wellness

Sports Physical Self-Survey

Every year, sports physicals are administered to our youth and adolescent athletes in order to ensure their safety and well being. Inevitably, a parent or student will ask, “Is this really necessary?”

The short answer is yes. Every major family, adolescent and sports-medicine society agrees on the importance of sports physicals to prevent serious illness, injury or even death from the unforseen consequences of participating in athletics. Sports physicals are key to uncovering health risks that young athletes may not be aware of. Often, a sports physical can lead to a behavior change or other remedy that not only keeps the young athlete safe; it can even improve performance on the field or in the gym.

Standards have been established that strongly encourage the use of a nationally developed form. In Delaware, this is the Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association’s pre-participation physical evaluation form.

We have formed a collaborative effort among health care professionals in Delaware to explain the benefits of sports physicals and to address many of the questions asked during these exams. As you answer the questions below, you will find helpful information and guidance on where to find out more about each of the subjects discussed.

Click “yes” or “no” for each of the following. A “yes” answer will provide you with more information about the topic. Where multiple questions are listed together, answer “yes” if any of them apply to you. If you have questions about any part of this survey, or if you need additional guidance, contact ChristianaCare Sports Medicine Services.

General Medical Advice

Has a doctor ever denied your participation in sports for any reason? Do you have an ongoing medical condition such as asthma or diabetes? Or has a doctor told you that you or someone in your family has sickle-cell trait or sickle-cell disease?

Medical conditions directly impact an athlete’s ability to perform at peak performance. Conditions such as asthma, heart disease and sickle cell trait reduce aerobic capacity, or the body’s ability to run faster and longer.

Conditions like diabetes, kidney disease and liver injury must be well controlled for an athlete to perform safely. Blood sugar decreases with exercise, and insulin needs may go down, but only your doctor will be able to determine by how much.

By properly treating these conditions, you can maximize your ability to become the best athlete possible. For more information, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Are you missing an internal organ such as a kidney, testicle, eye or any other organ?

Single organs are not necessarily a deterrent to safe participation in sports, but proper care must be taken to protect the remaining organ. Contact sports are most dangerous to single kidneys. Projectile sports (such as baseball or tennis) are concerning for single-eyed athletes.

With proper protection and care, most individuals with single organs can safely participate in sporting activities. For more information, contact your school’s certified athletic trainer, your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you had infectious mononucleosis (mono) within the past two months? Or when exercising in the heat, do you ever become ill or have severe cramps?

Infectious mononucleosus causes swelling in your liver and spleen, which makes them more likely to be damaged with any kind of athletic activity.

A history of heat illness and heat cramping makes you more likely to have the symptoms again and may be a sign of a more serious underlying condition like sickle-cell disease or thyroid problems. All of these conditions make exercising in temperature extremes more hazardous. Also, exercising while having a fever makes your body less responsive to changing environmental needs and risks injury to your internal organs such as your heart and kidneys.

For more information, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Are you currently taking any medications, vitamins, herbals or supplements? Do you have allergies to medications, pollens, foods or insects? Or do you ever smoke cigarettes or cigars, use snuff or chew tobacco?

Everything you put into your body, including medicine, supplements, energy drinks and cigarette toxins, has an effect on how you perform as an athlete. Some of these substances are helpful when taken properly, but some may be dangerous or deadly.

Allergens are a fact of life and can be managed successfully so they have minimal impact on sports participation. Pollen and insects have the greatest impact in the spring and summer.

For more information, contact your school’s certified athletic trainer, your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Heart Health

Have you ever passed out or nearly passed out during or after exercise?

Passing out, lightheadedness and other symptoms of fainting can be a sign of significant heart problems, even in the young. Although rare, these can be fatal if undiagnosed and untreated. The only way to know for sure is to review your symptoms with a physician trained in recognizing heart problems in athletes.

For more information, contact your doctor, a cardiologist knowledgeable in conditions of the athletic heart or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you ever had chest discomfort, pressure or pain during or after exercise? Or does your heart race or skip beats during exercise?

Chest discomfort, pressure, pain can be a sign of significant heart problems, even in the young. Irregular or fast heart beats can also be a sign that your heart is not working normally. Although rare, these can be fatal if undiagnosed and untreated. The only way to know for sure is to review your symptoms with a physician trained in recognizing heart problems in athletes.

For more information, contact your doctor, a cardiologist knowledgeable in conditions of the athletic heart or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Has a doctor ever told you that you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, a heart murmur or a heart infection? Or has a doctor ever ordered a test for your heart such as an EKG or echocardiogram?

Taking care of your body, especially while you are young, will help you to live a long and healthy life. Having a normal blood pressure and cholesterol will help prevent future heart disease.

High blood pressure in athletes can be made worse by athletic activity and can lead to stroke or other physical problems, even in the otherwise young and healthy person.

A history of a heart murmur or a heart infection may be signs of serious medical conditions and should be evaluated further. EKGs and echocardiograms are among the tests physicians use to determine how your heart is working.

For more information, contact your doctor, a cardiologist knowledgeable in conditions of the athletic heart or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Has anyone in your family ever died for no apparent reason? Has anyone in your family ever died of heart problems or sudden death before age 50? Does anyone in your family have heart problems? Or does anyone in your family have Marfan’s Syndrome?

A family history of any of the above conditions can be an indicator of a potential problem in others in the family, including you. Physicians ask these questions to get hints about what potential problems may arise during athletic competition and physical activity.

For more information, contact your doctor, a cardiologist knowledgeable in conditions of the athletic heart or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Bone, Joint and Muscle Health

Have you ever had an injury like a sprain, strain, muscle tear or tendonitis that caused you to miss a practice or game?

Injuries to your body can make the area more susceptible to further injury. Before returning to your sport, the affected area must be tested to reduce risk of further injury.

By properly treating injuries, you can maximize your potential to become the best athlete possible. For more information, contact your doctor, physical therapist, school’s athletic trainer or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you ever had any broken bones or joint injuries that required X-rays, MRI, CT, surgery, injections or physical therapy?

Broken bones require time to heal and need to be fully healed before you can return to athletic competition. MRIs and CT scans can help diagnose an injury and can give a medical professional information about your prognosis to return to play. After surgery, a surgeon may place restrictions on what activities an athlete may participate. All of these conditions typically require medical clearance to return to athletic competition.

By properly treating injuries, you can maximize your potential to become the best athlete possible. For more information, contact your doctor, physical therapist, school’s athletic trainer or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you ever had a stress fracture?

Stress fractures can be caused by dietary and nutritional abnormalities, underlying metabolic diseases or simply overuse of the bone suffering the stress fracture. Being out of competition for any length of time due to injury can result in decreased strength, flexibility and agility. It is important that before returning to your sport you contact your doctor, physical therapist, athletic trainer or sports-medicine specialist so that they may functionally test you for return to play.
You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you have atlantoaxial (neck) instability, or have you ever had an X-ray to check for one?

Atlantoaxial instability is diagnosed by excessive motion between the first two vertebrae in your neck. It can put you at risk for further injury and is often associated with Down’s Syndrome. Proper medical attention is necessary for treatment and to ensure that you understand the risks of collision sports before returning to prior activity levels.

For more information, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you regularly use a brace, crutch or cane?

Prolonged use of a brace, crutch or cane may lead to weakness of the affected area. Before you can safely return to athletic competition, the affected area must be tested for the ability to complete activities such as running, jumping and cutting. Also, if you must wear a support or a brace for competition, rules often require adequate protection and coverage of exposed hard plastic and metal parts on the brace.

By properly treating these conditions, you can maximize your potential to become the best athlete possible. For more information, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Lung and Respiratory Health

Have you ever been told you have asthma, allergies or lung disease? Have you ever used an inhaler or asthma medications?

Patients with these medical concerns may develop trouble with breathing during exercise. Appropriate initial evaluation may be made, and a treatment plan can be established to keep you from experiencing symptoms from these diseases.

The use of inhalers or asthma medications alert medical providers to the possibility of patients having reactive airway disease or asthma. Patients who currently use these medications frequently need treatment when exercising or participating in sports. Some patients who have needed these medications in the past also may need treatment when exercising. This information allows providers to make appropriate decisions in the care and treatment of athletes. In some cases, the use of inhalers during competition requires a signed note by your health care provider.

For more information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergies, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you cough, wheeze or have difficulty breathing during or after exercise?

Coughing, wheezing or difficulty breathing during and after exercise can be a sign of lung or even cardiac problems. Sometimes these symptoms can be related to being out of shape. But if they are excessive or continuous, you should be evaluated by your doctor. Some athletes may develop these symptoms only when participating in sports or exercises (known as exercise-induced asthma). Knowing this ahead of time may allow for treatment and more comfortable/better sports participation.

For more information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of exercise-related shortness of breath, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Is there anyone in your family who has asthma or allergies?

Sometime we find that people who have family members with asthma or allergies will also show signs and symptoms of these diseases. By knowing this history, we can follow you to make sure you do not have any problems with your breathing during exercise. If any of these diseases are present, it can make it difficult to breathe when exercising or even make you very tired during exercise.

For more information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergies, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Skin Health

Do you have any rashes, sores or other skin problems? Or have you ever had a herpes skin infection?

Skin conditions in general do not impact your abilities as an athlete, but they may raise cause for concern in certain contact sports.

Infections such as ringworm, herpes and impetigo may keep you out of sports if not treated properly. These infections can be reduced or prevented if proper steps are taken. MRSA—a bacterial infection also sometimes referred to as a “staph” infection—is also becoming a more important issue in sports participation, but the risk can be minimized with knowledge and prevention.

For more information, contact your school’s certified athletic trainer, your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Brain and Nervous System Health

Have you ever had a head injury or concussion? Or have you ever been hit in the head and been confused or lost your memory?

Concussions are a major risk of athletic participation, but the risk can be minimized. Education on proper technique of sports skills (like tackling in football), along with properly fitted safety equipment, can reduce the risk of getting a concussion.

After having a concussion, seeking proper care minimizes further risk and allows for safe return to sports. The greatest risk of death and permanent disability comes with second and third concussions that occur too soon after the first hit. This happens several times each year and is often preventable.

For more information regarding concussions, or if you have sustained a concussion recently, contact your school’s certified athletic trainer, your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you ever had a seizure? Or do you get headaches when you exercise?

Although not limiting of athletic participation, proper control of seizures is important to prevent injury to you or another athlete during competition. Headaches with exercise may be indicative of more serious issues such as tumors, but may also be reflective of poor hydration. Only a thorough physical examination can help determine your risk from these conditions.

For more information, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you ever had numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arms or legs after being hit or falling? Or have you ever been unable to move your arms or legs after being hit or falling?

Temporary paralysis or inability to move your arms or legs after a fall or being hit is often a sign of nerve damage. The brain, spinal cord or nerves to the arms or legs may be affected. Symptoms may last a few seconds or months. “Stingers,” “dead legs” and “shooters” are all forms of this type of injury. Often the cause is poor technique or being unprepared for the hit. Proper medical attention is necessary for treatment. Understanding your risks of repeat hits or falls is important before returning to prior activity levels.

For more information, contact your school’s certified athletic trainer, your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Women’s Health

Do you have irregular menstrual periods, or have you had fewer than eight menstrual periods in the last 12 months? Have you skipped your menstrual period for one or two months?

Having regular menstrual periods is a sign of good health. If you have fewer than eight periods in a year, then you could be at risk for osteoporosis (thin bones), fractures and infertility. If you stop having your regular period (if you skip a month or two) you should see a doctor as soon as possible, because your bones will already be at risk for becoming thinner. Waiting a year to count if you had enough periods is too long.

If you notice that your periods are becoming lighter or heavier, or the time between your cycles is changing, see your doctor. It is good to compare notes with your female friends and relatives, because this is very important to keep you, your bones and your fertility (ability to have children) healthy.

For more information about menstrual irregularities associated with exercise and physical activity, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Have you had a miscarriage, an abortion or live birth in the past 12 months?

If so, you could be at risk for anemia, which is low red blood cell count or low hemoglobin level. If you have anemia, you may be tired or feel fatigued, but you may not have any symptoms. Your doctor can check your levels of hemoglobin and may recommend vitamin and mineral supplements depending on the results. Some doctors can even do a test for anemia in their office, and you will have the results at that time.

For more information, contact your doctor, gynecologist or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Sports Nutrition

Do you have questions or concerns about your eating habits?

Good eating habits are necessary for you to recover from training and competition, improve in practice and perform your best in competition.

Regularly making poor food and beverage choices will make it difficult for you to be at your best on the field, in school and in social situations. Choosing healthy foods and beverages consistently and consuming these foods at the proper times are the cornerstones of eating to win.

Vitamin pills and supplements will not make up for a poor diet. Generally speaking, athletes need greater amounts of most nutrients than non-athletes. This means paying attention to the quality and quantity of the food you eat, as well as the timing of your eating. Athletes should avoid skipping meals and may benefit from “grazing” throughout the day on whole-grain cereals, breads, pastas, fruits and vegetables. Good sources of protein to enjoy include yogurt, soy milk and soy products, skim or 1 percent milk, cheese sticks, nuts, peanut butter, eggs and lean meat (skinless chicken, turkey, London broil, filet mignon and ham) and fish.

Aim to eat at least two fruits, three vegetables and two dairy servings each day. Three quarters of your plate should contain whole grain, fruit or vegetables, and one third of your plate should contain lean protein. Try to eat or drink a high-carbohydrate food or drink as soon as possible after exercise. It’s OK to occasionally eat fast food or snack on junk food and soda, but these foods should not be the mainstay of your diet.

If you would like more information on how to create a personalized performance eating plan for yourself or need tips on how to eat right at the right times, contact a nutritionist or sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you skip meals regularly? Or are you on a diet?

Following a diet without the guidance of a health-care professional or registered dietitian can negatively affect your performance. Skipping meals makes it difficult to consume enough fluid and food to fuel high-intensity exercise and properly recover from training and competition.

Generally speaking, athletes need greater amounts of most nutrients than non-athletes. Most diet plans are not designed for athletes, and many don’t provide enough energy or nutrients to meet the demands of your sport. Although you may lose weight, you may also find it more difficult to keep up in practice, finish strong at the end of an event or recover from exercise. Taking in fewer nutrients than you need may also increase your risk of illness or injury. This means paying attention to the quality and quantity of the food you eat, as well as the timing of your eating.

Lack of appetite due to fatigue or nerves is another reason athletes sometimes skip meals. It is important to eat before your event to maximize energy stores and prevent low blood sugar. Athletes should avoid skipping meals and may benefit from “grazing” throughout the day.

Diet pills and supplements should never be used without medical guidance. Diet pills often contain stimulants that may be dangerous. Other supplements may contain traces of anabolic steroids, which are dangerous and illegal. It’s best to try to change your weight during the off season when performance is least likely to be affected. No food or food group should be entirely eliminated or avoided.

For more information on how to improve your diet, contact a nutritionist or a certified sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you eat restaurant food, fast food or take-out food more than twice a week?

Eating out more than twice a week can lead to excessive fat, calorie, sodium and sugar intake unless care is taken in making healthy food choices. Cheaper convenience foods are often low in vitamins and minerals. In some cases, few healthy choices are available at restaurants, fast-food outlets or vending machines.

Adequate intake of vitamins and minerals is essential for energy production, muscle contraction and recovery. If you eat out more frequently than a few times per week, make sure you are consuming enough fruits and vegetables. Three quarters of your plate should contain whole grains, fruit or vegetables, and one third of your plate should contain lean protein. Limit intake of soft drinks. Also limit fried foods. When eating fast food, choose chili, baked potatoes, grilled chicken or small hamburgers. If available, choose yogurt, fruit or salad side dishes. When ordering subs, go heavier on the vegetables, lighter on the cheese, salami and fatty salad dressings like mayonnaise. Many convenience stores now offer fresh fruit, vegetable soups, pre-made salads and yogurt, which are good choices.

For more information on how to improve your diet, contact a nutritionist or a certified sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you have trouble keeping up with your teammates in practice, or do you run out of energy during games?

Running out of energy or difficulty keeping up may signal a variety of nutritional or medical problems. Difficulty in performing exercise that was once easy, along with changes in mood, may signal overtraining and a need for more rest between training sessions or a more gradual increase in training intensity. Your coach or personal trainer should be able to help in designing a proper training program.

Running out of energy may signal a variety of problems related to an inability to adapt to or recover from training. Inability to refill the carbohydrate stores in muscle can lead to feelings of heaviness and fatigue. Low carbohydrate stores may also cause you to run out of energy and reduce ability to concentrate at the end of a practice or competition. Dehydration can have similar effects. At times, iron deficiency or other nutritional deficiencies may be causing the problem.

If problems persist beyond two weeks, contact your doctor or a sports-medicine physician.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you need to lose or gain weight?

Trying to change weight without the guidance of a health care professional or registered dietitian can negatively affect your performance. Most diet plans are not designed for athletes, and many don’t provide enough energy or nutrients to meet the demands of your sport.

Gaining weight, especially muscle, in a healthy manner takes time and requires much planning and patience. Weight-gain diets may be too high in calories, protein or fat and may cause unwanted fat gain.Exercising outside of practice or beyond what your coach recommends may lead to overtraining, illness or injury and put you out of action.

Although eating less and exercising more may cause you to lose weight, you may also find it more difficult to keep up in practice, finish strong at the end of an event or recover from exercise. Taking in fewer nutrients than you need may also increase your risk of illness or injury.

Diet pills and supplements should never be used without medical guidance. Diet pills often contain stimulants that may be dangerous. Anabolic agents and steroids are dangerous, illegal and will disqualify you from competition.

Legal supplements such as creatine work best only if taken properly. When taking supplements, remember more is not better. There is nothing magical about protein supplements, but they may be a convenient way to add protein and calories to your diet.

It’s best to change body weight during the off season when performance is least likely to be affected.

For more information on how to best attain your goal weight, contact your school’s athletic trainer, your doctor, a sports-medicine physician or a sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Are you a vegetarian?

A vegetarian eating style can be a very healthy way to eat; however, a poorly planned vegetarian diet can worsen your athletic performance. Vegetarian athletes may be at risk for inadequate intake of calories, protein, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamin B12 and vitamin D. At greatest risk are athletes who, upon deciding to become vegetarian, stop eating meat with little thought about which foods they need to eat to replace the nutrients contained in meats.

If you are interested in becoming vegetarian, meet with a sports nutritionist or other health-care professional to make sure your diet contains enough nutrients to meet the demands of training and competing in your sport.

Discuss supplement dosing with a health care professional before beginning any supplements. For more information on vegetarian diets, contact a nutritionist or a sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you ever eat in secret? Or do you spend a lot of time thinking about ways to be thin? In the past year have you tried to lose weight or control your weight by vomiting, taking diet pills or laxatives, or starving yourself?

Eating in secret (rather than eating alone) implies that a person seeks to avoid people when eating. This could be to avoid perceived judgement from others or avoid embarrassment over the types of food or the amount of food being eaten. It may also be a reaction to restricting food intake during regular meal times and then privately eating out of hunger later in the day. Eating in secret can lead to more serious problems like anorexia, binge eating or bulimia. It’s important to identify the reasons behind why you are eating secretly (for example, embarrassment, risk of criticism from others, etc.) in order to stop the behavior and begin to enjoy food without concealing behaviors.

Having obsessive thoughts about dieting, food and your body is an indicator of an eating disorder. Spending a majority of the time thinking about your body is unhealthy and can cause problems such as lack of concentration and social isolation.

Eating disorders can not only lead to decreased exercise performance, but can lead to severe health complications. Lack of proper nutrients in the body can cause an increased risk of fractures, illness and loss of reproductive function among other serious conditions. Lack of fluid intake can cause dehydration and can also cause electrolyte abnormalities that may lead to heart problems.

If you find yourself spending a lot of time thinking negatively about your body, new diets to try or how to lose weight, you may want to speak to someone who can help. Vomiting, taking laxatives or avoiding food in order to lose weight, improve your body image or enhance your performance are dangerous behaviors that can lead to a serious eating disorder or distorted eating pattern. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) can affect athletes and hamper performance as well as causing serious medical complications.

Women athletes with distorted eating sometimes fit into a condition called the female athlete triad, a combination of low energy availability (with or without an eating disorder), amenorrhea (loss of a menstral cycle) and osteoporosis. The medical complications of this triad involve almost every body function and include the cardiovascular, endocrine, reproductive, skeletal, gastrointestinal, renal and central nervous systems. Whether or not your weight-control behaviors mark the beginning of an eating disorder, these are unhealthy behaviors that signal that there is something wrong.

Speaking with a health professional can help you make sure you have a healthy relationship with food and your body. For more information contact your doctor, nutritionist, sports nutritionist, or adolescent-health or sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Do you ever consume alcohol?

Alcohol consumption beyond moderate amounts can worsen athletic performance, contribute to dehydration and prolong exercise recovery. Alcohol decreases reaction time, hand-eye coordination, accuracy, balance and coordination. It may decrease strength, power, local muscular endurance, speed and cardiovascular endurance. Alcohol may contribute to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and interferes with muscle glycogen repletion, both of which accelerate fatigue.

Alcohol is illegal for those under 21 and is one of the most abused drugs in the United States. If you can legally consume alcohol, limit intake to moderate. For more information about alcohol and your diet, please contact a nutritionist or a sports nutritionist.

You’ve answered no, so you can move on to the next question.

Exercise

Do you exercise or participate in sport activities that make you sweat and breathe hard for 20 minutes or more fewer than three times a week?

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends regular exercise for children and adolescents and supports a reasonable goal for each child to engage in at least a moderate level of physical activity 30 to 60 minutes on most days of the week. The activity should include brief periods of rest and recovery as needed.

The National Association for Sport and Physical Education released a position statement for children ages 5 to 12 that includes in its guidelines to partake in age- appropriate moderate and vigorous physical activity for at least 60 minutes, and up to several hours, on all or most days of the week. The majority of the time spent in activity should be intermittent in nature, with several bouts lasting 15 minutes or more each day. These activities should be designed to achieve optimal health, wellness, fitness and performance benefits. Conversely, extended periods of two hours or more of inactivity are discouraged, especially during daytime hours.

For more information regarding activity and exercise, contact a health care professional or an exercise specialist.

You’ve answered yes, so you can move on to the next question.

Ergogenic Aids, Supplements, Stimulants

Have you ever used steroid pills or shots without a doctor telling you to?

Steroids, stimulants, performance enhancers and other “ergogenic aids” are potentially dangerous to your health if not used correctly, and in many cases illegal. Even in cases where the government has not outlawed these substances, several governing bodies have banned them. Getting caught means a suspension from competitive athletics. Additionally, many supplements, protein shakes and other seemingly healthy performance aids contain small amounts of banned substances that can result in a positive drug test when ingested. Your athletic trainer or a sports-medicine specialist will have a list of banned substances by governing body and the means to check commercially available products for the presence of banned substances. Many online resources are also available, such as www.drugfreesport.com.

For more information, contact your doctor, your school’s athletic trainer or a sports-medicine specialist.

You’ve answered no and finished the survey.
Congratulations! You have completed the survey. In the course of this survey, you may have identified a concern or question that warrants further discussion with a sports-medicine specialist, a cardiologist, a nutritionist or other health care provider. Visit our online search to find an appropriate doctor near you.