Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Breast Cancer Research Program at the
Helen F. Graham Cancer Center
& Research Institute

About the Cutting-Edge Breast Cancer Research at ChristianaCare

Magnetic resonance image (MRI) of individual breast, demonstrating marked enhancement (bright area) which was confirmed to be cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the body in both health and disease. MRI scanners use magnetic fields and radio waves to form images of the body. The technique is widely used in hospitals for medical diagnosis, staging of disease and follow-up without exposure to ionizing radiation.
Working side-by-side, physicians and scientific researchers from ChristianaCare’s Cawley Center for Translational Cancer Research, University of Delaware and The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia identify the needs of individual patients at the bedside, explore solutions in the lab and translate those results directly into treatment plans as unique as the individuals who will benefit from them. Here are just a few of the exciting breast cancer research studies currently underway at ChristianaCare:

Research areas of interest include the following:

  • Developing liquid biopsies for breast cancer.
  • Exploring near infrared imaging for early detection of breast cancer.
  • Designing novel 3-D models to study breast cancer metastasis.
  • Improving response to immunotherapeutics with radiation therapy.
  • Understanding the role of inflammation in the metastasis and resistance of triple negative breast cancer.
  • Investigating the role of B lymphocytes in triple negative breast cancer.
  • Targeting nanotherapeutics for the treatment of breast cancer.
  • Identifying early risk factors and prevention strategies for breast cancer

Latest Study

Surviving Cancer Together

The Health Consequences of Fear of Cancer Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors and Partners study is supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study is being conducted by the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute in association with the University of Delaware. The goal of this study is to better understand the long-term experiences of breast cancer patients and their spouses/partners, including emotional and physical well-being, relationship quality, and concerns for the future. www.overcomingcancertogether.org

Cancer Research Program
Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute
4701 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Suite 2200, Newark, DE 19713 directions
For more information, call 302-623-4450 or e-mail us.