Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center
& Research Institute

Side Effects After Cancer Treatment

A Word About Fatigue

In particular, cancer survivors may experience ongoing fatigue, sometimes for years after their treatment has ended. Exercise has been found to be the best way to help manage fatigue. If you experience persistent fatigue, speak with your oncologist about a referral to our Rehabilitation Program, where professionals can create a customized program to help you regain function and improve endurance.

Many cancer survivors are surprised to learn that side effects don’t magically disappear as soon as their treatment has ended. Remember that your body needs time to heal and adjust. It is normal for some side effects to last a year or more. It is also common for new side effects to appear after treatment is over, even months or years later. Talk to your treatment team about managing them.

Physical side effects may include:

  • Fatigue.
  • Pain.
  • Poor appetite or difficulty eating.
  • Neuropathy.
  • Memory/concentration difficulties.
  • Bladder or bowel control problems.
  • Menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes.

Psychosocial and other issues:

  • Fear of recurrence.
  • Depression.
  • Anger or irritability.
  • Confusion.
  • Changes in body image.
  • Difficulties with sexual intimacy or functioning.
  • Worry about returning to work/activities.

For questions about life after cancer treatment, please call our Survivorship Nurse Navigator at 302-623-4866.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute
4701 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Newark, DE 19713 directions
302-623-4500