Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Clinical Trials

Your Rights and Privacy

At ChristianaCare, all studies are first approved by the Institutional Review Board, a special committee that reviews and oversees all research projects to ensure that participants’ rights and welfare are protected. The IRB includes doctors, nurses and other health care professionals, research scientists and community members.

The IRB reviews each study to make sure it is safe and reasonable to ask for volunteers and that any associated risks are as small as possible. The IRB continues to monitor the study as it progresses to make sure volunteers are protected.

Your participation is always voluntary

Participation in any medical research trial is completely voluntary. During the course of the study, you may be told of new findings, benefits or risks. At that time, you may decide to leave the study. It is your choice to participate or to leave a study at any time, including after the study has started or during follow-up.

If you do not wish to take part in a study or if you decide to stop participating after the study has begun, know that your decision will in no way interfere with the quality of medical care you receive.

Informed consent

When you volunteer to join a clinical trial, you will be asked to give your informed consent. Your signature on the informed consent form says that you voluntarily agree to participate and that you understand the key facts about the research study, including what will take place in the study and how it might affect you. A research nurse will discuss the research study with you, answer any questions you may have and help you fill out the informed consent form. You may need approval from both your primary-care physician and your specialist (if you have one) to participate in a clinical research study.

Your records will remain confidential

Your medical records and your study records will be kept confidential. Information about your medical or study records will only be given to the researchers conducting the study or to those responsible for making sure the study is safe and following approved procedures. These groups would include members of the research staff, the Institutional Review Board, the company or group funding the study and the appropriate government agencies who oversee the study. Your records can provide important information to these review groups about whether the study is following acceptable research practices.