ChristianaCare

All visitors are required to wear masks.

For COVID-19 safety, all visitors to ChristianaCare facilities and services are required to wear masks. This includes visitors who are vaccinated. Please read our visitor guidelines before arrival.

Masks required at outpatient locations; visitors and support persons limited

All visitors at outpatient locations must be masked in alignment with the masking guidelines on our visitation policy page here. Patients at ChristianaCare’s outpatient services are advised to come to their appointments alone unless a support person is absolutely needed. If a support person is needed, such as a parent, guardian or spokesperson, we highly encourage that the support person be vaccinated. Outpatient practices are not requiring vaccination or a negative COVID test for visitors at this time.

All hospital visitors required to be vaccinated or have a negative COVID-19 test.

  • Inpatients in our Christiana, Wilmington and Union hospitals may have one visitor daily between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. The visitor must be 16 or older.
  • Patients having outpatient surgery may have one support person accompany them. Support persons must be 16 or older.
  • All visitors and surgical support people must show proof of vaccination OR a negative COVID-19 test within the prior 72 hours.

Before visiting, click here for more details about visitation.

Visit coronavirus.delaware.gov or cecilcountyhealth.org for local vaccination and testing sites.

Center for Heart & Vascular Health

Nuclear Cardiology

Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses safe, painless, cost-effective techniques to document the structure and function of organs inside the body. An integral part of patient care at ChristianaCare, nuclear medicine is used in the diagnosis and management of diseases.

Nuclear medicine uses a very small amount of radioactive materials-called radiopharmaceuticals-to diagnose and treat disease. Radiopharmaceuticals are substances that are attached to specific organs, bones or tissues. The radiopharmaceuticals emit gamma rays that can be detected externally by special types of cameras: gamma or PET cameras. These cameras work in conjunction with computers to form images that provide data and information about the area of the body being imaged.

Nuclear cardiology uses the tools of nuclear medicine specifically to look inside the heart. Nuclear cardiology tests include the MUGA scan and myocardial perfusion test.