Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Center for Heart & Vascular Health

Balloon Valvuloplasty

What is Stenosis?

Valves control the flow of blood into, through and out of the heart. In valve disease, the valve may narrow (stenosis), which can reduce blood flow. Common causes of valve disease include:

  • Congenital heart conditions, meaning they are present from birth.
  • Rheumatic fever, often associated with untreated strep throat or scarlet fever.
  • The formation of calcium deposits around the valve.
  • Atherosclerosis, which is the narrowing and hardening of the arteries.
  • Endocarditis, which is inflammation of the lining inside the heart.

Symptoms can vary and include fatigue, dizziness, shortness of breath, swelling of the feet and ankles, chest pain and heart palpitations.

About Balloon Valvuloplasty

Balloon valvuloplasty is a percutaneous procedure, meaning it is “through the skin,” as opposed to a traditional, open surgical procedure that requires large incisions. To perform the procedure, your interventional cardiologist will thread a catheter (thin, flexible tube) with a deflated balloon attached to the tip through a blood vessel. Using x-ray technology, they will guide the catheter to your damaged valve. Once the catheter is in place, they will inflate the balloon, which stretches the valve opening and allows blood to flow through it. The balloon is then deflated and the catheters are removed.

The patient usually remains awake during the procedure, which generally takes about two hours. You will then go to the recovery area and stay overnight. After your transition home, your care team will follow-up with you to ensure you have a smooth recovery. The balloon valvuloplasty procedure is not a permanent solution and may need to be repeated at a later date.

ChristianaCare Structural Heart Program
Christiana Hospital
4755 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Newark, DE 19718 directions
302-733-1507
structuralheartcoordinators@christianacare.org