Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare Neurosciences

Stroke Warning Signs

If you experience any of these symptoms, do not delay. Call 911 immediately!

Warning signs of a stroke are clues that your brain is not getting enough oxygen. You and your family should learn these warning signs. You could have only one, or you may have several. They may last only a few minutes. You can help lower your risk of death or disability by knowing these warning signs.

Warning signs of a stroke:

  • Sudden weakness, numbness or paralysis of the face, hand, arm or leg on one side of the body.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden confusion, slurred speech, trouble speaking or trouble understanding others.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

If you suspect a stroke do the FAST test to recognize the symptoms:

  • Face: Does the face look uneven? Ask the person to smile.
  • Arm: Does the arm drift down? Ask the person to raise both arms.
  • Speech: Does his or her speech sound strange? Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase.
  • Time: If you observe any of these signs, then it’s time to call 911.

Time lost is brain lost; with every minute that goes by, brain cells die. There are treatments which can be started in the hospital to open up a blocked artery in the brain but they need to be started as soon as possible. One is a medication called alteplase, but it can only be given within a few hours of the start of stroke symptoms. There are other treatments including emergency surgeries to open up blocked blood vessels; these treatments must be started as soon as possible as well.