ChristianaCare

Flu season visitor restriction – age 16 or older (Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu) – Mayores de 16 años.)

Flu Season Visitor Restriction

Visitors temporarily restricted to age 16 or older

As a safety first organization, ChristianaCare is implementing a temporary visitation age restriction starting Tuesday, Jan. 21. This temporary restriction protects patients, their loved ones and health care workers during this time of extremely high number of influenza cases and other respiratory illnesses circulating in our community.

The new restrictions limit visitors to patients in Christiana and Wilmington hospitals to persons age 16 or older. Children and teens younger than 16 years are most likely to get the flu and remain contagious longer than adults. This restriction does not apply to outpatient and ambulatory services.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

For more information about the Flu visit our Health Library.


Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu)

Temporalmente solo se permiten los visitantes mayores de 16 años.

Como una organización que promueve la seguridad ante todo, ChristianaCare está implementando una restricción temporal en la edad de visitantes a partir del viernes 21 de enero. Esta restricción temporal protege a los pacientes, a sus seres queridos y al personal de cuidados de salud durante esta época con un número extremadamente alto de casos de influenza y de otras enfermedades respiratorias que circulan en nuestra comunidad.

Las nuevas restricciones, en los hospitales Christiana y Wilmington, sólo permiten visitas a pacientes de personas mayores de 16 años. Los niños y adolescentes menores de 16 años son más propensos a contraer el flu y son contagiosos por más tiempo que los adultos. Esta restricción no aplica a las áreas de servicios ambulatorios.

Gracias por su comprensión y cooperación.

Para más información sobre la gripe, visite nuestra Biblioteca de Salud.

Illness and Allergies

Mother wiping nose of baby son with tissue

Allergies are problems of the immune system. Most allergic reactions happen when the immune system reacts to a “false alarm.” Normally, the human body defends itself against harmful things, such as viruses or bacteria. But sometimes the defenses violently attack mostly mild things, such as dust, mold, or pollen.

These allergies usually show up in infancy or childhood and can disrupt your child’s ability to sleep well, function in school and go about their daily lives.

Find a Doctor

If you suspect your child has an allergy, get in touch with a healthcare professional so that they can undergo tests.

What are the symptoms of allergies in a child?

An allergic reaction can happen anywhere in the body. This includes the skin, eyes, lining of the stomach, nose, sinuses, throat, and lungs. These are the places where immune system cells are found to fight off germs that are in breathed in, swallowed, or come in contact with the skin.

The immune system makes large amounts of the antibodies called immunoglobin E (IgE). This is a complex chemical weapon that attacks and kills the “enemy.” Each IgE antibody exactly targets a certain allergen or thing that causes the allergy. In this way, inflammatory chemicals are made and given off. This causes the child to feel some bad or even life-threatening symptoms.

Allergic reactions can cause:

  • Stuffy nose, sneezing, itching, or runny nose, and itching in ears or roof of mouth.
  • Red, itchy, watery eyes.
  • Red, itchy, dry skin.
  • Hives or itchy welts.
  • Itchy rash.
  • Asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing.
  • Difficulty breathing.
  • Low blood pressure during a severe reaction.