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Research

DESIGNING EFFECTIVE,
AFFORDABLE SYSTEMS OF CARE

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Gene editing: Cancer's code breaker

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At ChristianaCare, we are passionate about exploring new frontiers, where scholarship meets science and practice to propel innovations in prevention, care and treatment from the bench to the bedside. We are committed to research that contributes to value and high-quality care for our neighbors and around the world.

DESIGNING EFFECTIVE, AFFORDABLE SYSTEMS OF CARE

Groundbreaking discovery identifies drivers of colon cancer

In breakthrough colon cancer research, ChristianaCare scientists have discovered that the overexpression of HOXA4 and HOXA9 genes in colon cancer stem cells promotes cell replication and contributes to the overpopulation of stem cells that drives the development of colon cancer. Findings suggest treatment with vitamin A derivatives, called retinoid drugs, could provide a therapeutic strategy for decreasing the expression of HOX genes and targeting highly resistant cancer stem cells.

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Evaluating balloon treatment

Evaluating balloon treatment

Prospective analysis of aspirational mechanical thrombectomy for PE

Prospective analysis of aspirational mechanical thrombectomy for PE

Clinical trial for heart failure patients with iron deficiency

Clinical trial for heart failure patients with iron deficiency

Leading the way in finding a low-cost solution to preterm births

Leading the way in finding a low-cost solution to preterm births

Study shows anesthetic block reduces need for narcotics

Study shows anesthetic block reduces need for narcotics

Clinical trial examines role of induction in how babies ARRIVE

Clinical trial examines role of induction in how babies ARRIVE

A transformative tool in the fight against breast cancer

A transformative tool in the fight against breast cancer

A more effective approach  to blocking tumor growth

A more effective approach to blocking tumor growth

Evaluating balloon treatment

Prospective analysis of aspirational mechanical thrombectomy for PE

Clinical trial for heart failure patients with iron deficiency

Clinical trial examines role of induction in how babies ARRIVE

Leading the way in finding a low-cost solution to preterm births

Study shows anesthetic block reduces need for narcotics

A transformative tool in the fight against breast cancer

A more effective approach to blocking tumor growth

Evaluating balloon treatment

ChristianaCare is playing an important role in RANGER II SFA, a randomized trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the RANGER Paclitaxel-coated balloon versus standard balloon angioplasty for treating superficial femoral and proximal popliteal artery lesions. The study focuses on patients who present with claudication or ischemic rest pain, an angiographically significant lesion in the superficial femoral and/or proximal popliteal artery and a patent outflow artery to the foot. Drug-coated balloon treatment has emerged as a therapeutic alternative in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease and peripheral artery disease in the superficial femoral and proximal popliteal arteries as the femoropopliteal artery does not respond well to rigid stents.

Prospective analysis of aspirational mechanical thrombectomy for PE

Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is believed to be the third most common cause of death among hospitalized patients. In patients who are not candidates for systemic thrombolysis or for whom the treatment doesn’t work, catheter-directed therapy to achieve rapid central clot debulking can be considered as an alternative treatment option for patients with acute massive PE. Currently, it is unknown if catheter aspiration thrombectomy with the Indigo Aspiration System can safely improve patient outcomes for patients with PE. ChristianaCare is playing a key role in an exploratory prospective analysis to collect outcomes for patients treated with this novel method of thrombus aspiration.

Clinical trial for heart failure patients with iron deficiency

More than 5 million people in the United States live with heart failure. This study aims to determine the efficacy and safety of iron therapy using intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), in the treatment of patients in heart failure with iron deficiency and with a reduced ejection fraction. This is a double-blind, multicenter, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study to assess the effects of IV FCM compared to placebo on the 12-month rate of death, hospitalization for worsening heart failure, and the six-month change in a  six-minute walk test for patients in heart failure with iron deficiency.

Leading the way in finding a low-cost solution to preterm births

ChristianaCare is playing a key role in the ASPIRIN trial, which will be the largest-ever trial looking at the role of aspirin in preventing preterm birth, a leading factor in infant mortality. Prior data has suggested that low-dose aspirin given early in pregnancy may lower the risk of preterm birth by 20 percent or more. If the study supports that, aspirin could prove an accessible low-cost treatment for expectant women living in poverty. The study, described in the global journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, was conducted in six low- and middle-income countries and included recruitment of nearly 12,000 women.

Study shows anesthetic block reduces need for narcotics

A study examined the use of an anesthetic block in controlling postoperative pain associated with endometrial ablation, a common procedure to control uterine bleeding. This randomized controlled trial found that local anesthetic with low risk for complications, used in conjunction with general anesthesia, decreased postoperative pain at one hour and significantly reduced postoperative narcotic use following endometrial ablation. Women who received general anesthesia, plus a paracervical block after the procedure, used 3.6 less morphine equivalents of postoperative pain medication than women who received a placebo injection of saline solution and general anesthesia. The study concludes that further research is needed to establish the best time to administer the block.

Nurses and baby

Clinical trial examines role of induction in how babies ARRIVE

ChristianaCare, one of the highest-volume health systems for delivering babies, was a participant in the groundbreaking ARRIVE trial, a prospective randomized trial of planned induction of labor at 39 weeks compared to expectant management of first-time mothers. The study of 6,106 women demonstrated that labor induction at 39 weeks resulted in lower cesarean rates and improved maternal experience. Similarly, there was a reduction in preeclampsia, a common but potentially severe complication of pregnancy, and a strong trend to improved outcomes. Results of the study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, challenge traditional thought processes in managing pregnancies and could impact shifts in policy.

A transformative tool in the fight against breast cancer

Scientists at the Center for Translational Cancer Research at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute have developed a revolutionary new blood test to diagnose breast cancer. This simple tool, used in combination with mammography, can be a transformative tool in the fight against cancer by determining whether cancer is present in the breast and whether the cancer is likely to spread. The test could minimize overdiagnosis and treatment, improve patient experience and produce significant savings in health care costs.

Scientists working on cancer research

A more effective approach to blocking tumor growth

Medical and surgical oncologists at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute collaborated with research scientists at The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia to discover a novel form of cell-to-cell crosstalk in the tumor microenvironment that neutralizes current immunotherapeutic strategies designed to block tumor growth. Their findings, published in Cancer Cell, also suggest a more effective approach to blocking the growth of tumors.

Nurses and baby