Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Cancer Research at the
Helen F. Graham Cancer Center
& Research Institute

Colon Cancer Research

Program Description

The long term goal of the research led by Bruce Boman, M.D., Ph.D., is to identify cancer stem cell-based targets that will lead to the development of new more effective, potentially even curative, treatments for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

Based on the emerging paradigm in oncology, effective treatments will need to target cancer stem cells, which are the cells that become overpopulated during tumorigenesis and drive tumor growth. To understand how stem cell overpopulation drives tumor growth, Dr. Boman’s lab has been studying the effect of the main mutation (i.e. APC) that drives the development of colorectal cancer. APC mutations are the most frequent (>85%) genetic alteration occurring in colorectal cancers. Dr. Boman’s lab found that APC mutations cause progressive expansion of the SC population during development of colorectal cancer in humans. This finding led to the publication that stem cell overproduction results from increased symmetric stem cell division.

Dr. Boman’s lab recently discovered that ALDH is a marker for colonic stem cells, and allows the tracking of stem cell overpopulation due to APC mutation during colon cancer development. This recent discovery raised the question: What are the underlying mechanisms that lead to stem cell overpopulation? To seek an answer, Dr. Boman’s lab is currently investigating which ALDH isoforms are critical to ALDH activity, whether specific pathways, such as neuroendocrine or retinoid, are involved in maturation and death of cancer stem cells, and what kinetic mechanisms drive colon cancer growth and development. Based on their research findings, the lab’s scientific team postulates that targeting the cellular mechanisms affected by APC mutation that cause cancer stem cell overpopulation and drive colon tumor growth offers a new and more effective approach toward treatment of colorectal cancer.

Overall, the research findings by this team of scientists at the Cawley Center for Translational Cancer Research provide new concepts on how discoveries from basic cancer research might be translated into the clinical setting with the development of new therapies for patients with advanced stages of colorectal cancer.

Cancer Research Program
Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute
4701 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Suite 2200, Newark, DE 19713 directions
For more information, call 302-623-4450 or e-mail us.