Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center
& Research Institute

Self-Care for the Body, Mind and Spirit

Will It Come Back?

Finding productive ways to manage the very real fear of having your cancer return is an important part of your emotional recovery.

Worrying about a cancer recurrence is normal, but some people worry so much that they have trouble functioning in their daily lives. You can help manage these concerns by talking with supportive friends and family and your treatment team. If you feel you need additional support, a support group or individual counseling may be the answer.

See the Resources page for more information.

Taking Care of Your Body

Many survivors find their cancer experience is a turning point in the way they approach their health and self care. Good health behaviors can do wonders for the body. Although your individual needs are unique, all survivors benefit from:

Eating a healthy diet.

In a nutshell, you should eat less red and processed meats, and eat more fruits and vegetables.

Dietitians at the Graham Cancer Center can provide more detail about how to improve your diet. Call 302-623-4593 (extension 2) to schedule your appointment.

Please consult with your physician before making any dietary changes.

Exercising.

Start adding activity slowly and work up to at least three times per week for 20 minutes. Establish a routine and stick to it.

Please consult with your physician before starting an exercise routine.

Maintaining a healthy weight.

Talk to your dietitian or a doctor specializing in weight loss for help losing weight and reducing your BMI if you are overweight.

Limiting alcohol consumption.

Men should have no more than two alcohol drinks a day; women should have no more than one.

Quitting smoking.

Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your health. See the Resources page for help quitting.

Wearing sunscreen.

Every time you go outside during daylight hours — even on cloudy or hazy days and even in winter — wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30.

Getting enough sleep.

Good sleep fuels your mind, as well as your body. Try to get seven to eight hours a night.

 

Taking Care of Your Mind and Spirit

While there is no question that cancer takes a toll on the body, it also can take a significant toll on your mental and emotional health. It is normal to experience stress and anxiety during and after cancer treatment. Good health behaviors, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising, can do wonders for the mind as well as the body.

Some suggestions for managing stress and anxiety include:

  • Finding ways to relax — Studies show that as little as five minutes a day of meditation, deep breathing or yoga can lower blood pressure, release healing hormones and increase creativity.
  • Exercising — Release those endorphins, the body’s natural pain killers!
  • Laughing as often as possible — Laughter lowers blood pressure, reduces stress hormones and boosts your immune system’s functioning.
  • Doing things you enjoy — Hobbies increase creativity, help prevent burnout and allow you to recharge. Make time for old or new ones, such as gardening, crafting, fishing, games or reading.
  • Asking for and accepting help — Clarify values and prioritize tasks. Address things that are both important and urgent first. Also, learn how to say “no” to requests that overwhelm you.
  • Connecting with others — Spend time with positive people who enhance your life. Find a support group if you think being around other cancer survivors will help you. Pets can also bring you joy and comfort.
  • Being grateful — Research shows gratitude exercises results in fewer physical complaints and higher levels of alertness, enthusiasm, determination, optimism and energy. List three things you are thankful for each day.

If you’re struggling to adjust to your “new normal,” the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute offers counseling and support by professionals with expertise in the emotional and psychological side effects of cancer treatment and survivorship. See Resources for more information, or call our Survivorship Nurse Navigator at 302-623-4866.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute
4701 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Newark, DE 19713 directions
302-623-4500