Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids are extremely common benign (noncancerous) tumors that grow in the uterus. According to a study in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology1, 80 to 90 percent of African American women and 70 percent of white women will develop uterine fibroids by age 50. While uterine fibroids are not cancer, they can cause problems for some women. It may be time to consider treatment if you have one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Unpredictable periods.
  • Heavy menstrual bleeding.
  • Frequent urge to urinate.
  • Pelvic pain and/or cramping with periods.
  • Sexual issues.

Nonsurgical Treatment for Uterine Fibroids

Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE)

The UFE procedure is a minimally invasive procedure performed by a Vascular Interventional Radiologist (VIR). Using x-ray guidance, the IR threads a catheter through a tiny incision in your wrist or groin. Once the catheter is in place, the IR sends tiny particles through it to block the small blood vessels that feed blood to the fibroids. Without a blood supply, the uterine fibroids shrink. They may disappear completely, or they may shrink to the point where you no longer experience symptoms.

UFE has some advantages over other treatment options:

  • Nonsurgical treatment with lower risk of complications.
  • Minimally invasive procedure.
  • Preserves the uterus and may preserve fertility.
  • Shorter recovery time than traditional surgery.
  • Unlikely to cause early menopause.
  • Fast symptom relief.
  • Minimal blood loss through small incision.

The UFE procedure usually takes from one to three hours. After the procedure, a nurse will bandage your incision and you will be on bed rest for up to 3 hours. You may stay overnight in the hospital for observation. Following UFE, you may experience moderate pelvic cramping and nausea, which can be controlled with medication.

You should be able to return to your usual activities in seven to 10 days. As the fibroids break down, you may have occasional vaginal bleeding that may last a couple of weeks, but in some cases, it can last for several months.

To find out more visit: The fibroid fix: What women need to know.

 

Having a procedure and want to learn more before coming in?

Visit our Virtual Interventional Labs Tour.

To learn more about vascular interventional radiology, including detailed information and videos about procedures and treatments, visit The Society of Interventional Radiology

 

ChristianaCare Vascular Interventional Radiology
Center for Heart & Vascular Health
4755 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Suite 1E20, Newark, DE 19713 directions
302-733-5625