Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare
Rehabilitation Services

Aquatic Therapy

Aquatic physical therapy makes it possible to perform exercises with greater ease and comfort. The buoyancy of water reduces stress on irritated joints and structures, making movement easier and less painful.  At the same time, patients are challenged to improve balance and stability as they work against water’s resistance.

ChristianaCare offers aquatic therapy for a variety of conditions, including:

  • Weight-bearing limitations or restrictions.
  • Post-surgical restrictions.
  • Limited range of motion, strength or endurance.
  • Orthopaedic injuries.
  • Degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Neurological impairment.
  • Balance and coordination loss.
  • Poor tolerance to land-based therapy.
  • Lower back or leg pain.

Getting started

Your physical therapist may recommend aquatic therapy after your initial physical therapy evaluation. Typically, if you begin with aquatic therapy, you will gradually transition to traditional physical therapy as you reach therapy goals in the water. For some patients, a combination of water and land-based therapy is recommended.