ChristianaCare

Flu season visitor restriction – age 16 or older (Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu) – Mayores de 16 años.)

Flu Season Visitor Restriction

Visitors temporarily restricted to age 16 or older

As a safety first organization, ChristianaCare is implementing a temporary visitation age restriction starting Tuesday, Jan. 21. This temporary restriction protects patients, their loved ones and health care workers during this time of extremely high number of influenza cases and other respiratory illnesses circulating in our community.

The new restrictions limit visitors to patients in Christiana and Wilmington hospitals to persons age 16 or older. Children and teens younger than 16 years are most likely to get the flu and remain contagious longer than adults. This restriction does not apply to outpatient and ambulatory services.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

For more information about the Flu visit our Health Library.


Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu)

Temporalmente solo se permiten los visitantes mayores de 16 años.

Como una organización que promueve la seguridad ante todo, ChristianaCare está implementando una restricción temporal en la edad de visitantes a partir del viernes 21 de enero. Esta restricción temporal protege a los pacientes, a sus seres queridos y al personal de cuidados de salud durante esta época con un número extremadamente alto de casos de influenza y de otras enfermedades respiratorias que circulan en nuestra comunidad.

Las nuevas restricciones, en los hospitales Christiana y Wilmington, sólo permiten visitas a pacientes de personas mayores de 16 años. Los niños y adolescentes menores de 16 años son más propensos a contraer el flu y son contagiosos por más tiempo que los adultos. Esta restricción no aplica a las áreas de servicios ambulatorios.

Gracias por su comprensión y cooperación.

Para más información sobre la gripe, visite nuestra Biblioteca de Salud.

Caregiver Advice

Mother and daughter hugging in living room

Being a caregiver can be rewarding, but it also brings up a lot of emotions, stresses and challenges when combined with daily life. We are here to support you in your giving of care and can advise you on how to ensure that you are doing the best you can while balancing your own personal life and needs.

Explore Useful Links

If you are a caregiver or know of a loved one in need of help, please get in touch so we can explore your options in a sympathetic, confidence space.

Types of Caregivers

A caregiver provides assistance in meeting the daily needs of another person. Caregivers are referred to as either “formal” or “informal.”

“Formal” caregivers are paid for their services and have had training and education in providing care. This may include services from home health agencies and other trained professionals.

“Informal” caregivers, also called family caregivers, are people who give care to family or friends usually without payment. A caregiver gives care, generally in the home environment, for an aging parent, spouse, other relative, or unrelated person, or for an ill, or disabled person. These tasks may include transportation, grocery shopping, housework, preparing meals. Also giving assistance with getting dressed, getting out of bed, help with eating, and incontinence.

If you fit the description of a family, or “informal” caregiver, you are not alone. According to the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) and the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC), estimates of more than 65.7 million Americans serve as informal caregivers either to a child with special needs or an adult who lives in the community and needs help.

Most caregivers (86%) are related to the care recipient with about a third caring for a parent. The average age of a caregiver is 49. Most caregivers are women (66%), but men also serve as caregivers. It is also a myth that most of the elderly are cared for in nursing homes in the U.S. Most long-term care is provided by family and friends in the home. Only 11% live in a nursing home or an assisted-living facility It is unfortunate that experts estimate that 1.3 million to 1.4 million children, ages 8 to 18, care for an adult relative.

Being a Caregiver

Caring for an ill, aging, or disabled person can be a rewarding experience. However, depending on the level of care needed and other demands on the caregiver’s time and energy, it can also become an overwhelming responsibility.

Seminars & Classes

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