Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

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Caregiver Advice

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Being a caregiver can be rewarding, but it also brings up a lot of emotions, stresses and challenges when combined with daily life. We are here to support you in your giving of care and can advise you on how to ensure that you are doing the best you can while balancing your own personal life and needs.

Explore Useful Links

If you are a caregiver or know of a loved one in need of help, please get in touch so we can explore your options in a sympathetic, confidence space.

Types of Caregivers

A caregiver provides assistance in meeting the daily needs of another person. Caregivers are referred to as either “formal” or “informal.”

“Formal” caregivers are paid for their services and have had training and education in providing care. This may include services from home health agencies and other trained professionals.

“Informal” caregivers, also called family caregivers, are people who give care to family or friends usually without payment. A caregiver gives care, generally in the home environment, for an aging parent, spouse, other relative, or unrelated person, or for an ill, or disabled person. These tasks may include transportation, grocery shopping, housework, preparing meals. Also giving assistance with getting dressed, getting out of bed, help with eating, and incontinence.

If you fit the description of a family, or “informal” caregiver, you are not alone. According to the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) and the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC), estimates of more than 65.7 million Americans serve as informal caregivers either to a child with special needs or an adult who lives in the community and needs help.

Most caregivers (86%) are related to the care recipient with about a third caring for a parent. The average age of a caregiver is 49. Most caregivers are women (66%), but men also serve as caregivers. It is also a myth that most of the elderly are cared for in nursing homes in the U.S. Most long-term care is provided by family and friends in the home. Only 11% live in a nursing home or an assisted-living facility It is unfortunate that experts estimate that 1.3 million to 1.4 million children, ages 8 to 18, care for an adult relative.

Being a Caregiver

Caring for an ill, aging, or disabled person can be a rewarding experience. However, depending on the level of care needed and other demands on the caregiver’s time and energy, it can also become an overwhelming responsibility.