Delays, Closures and Cancellations Due to Winter Weather

Here are the Christiana Care Health System delays, closures and cancellations due to the winter storm on Wednesday, February 20, 2019. Check back for updates.

Closures & Cancellations:

  • The Brain Aneurysm Support Group meeting scheduled on Wednesday, February 20 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. is canceled.
  • The Breastfeeding Support Group scheduled for Wednesday, February 20 is canceled.

Christiana Care Health System’s essential hospital and emergency services, including the Emergency Departments at Christiana and Wilmington hospitals and Middletown, are open and will continue to operate without interruption. If you have any questions about the cancellation of your appointment, please call your physician.

Flu season visitor restriction – age 16 or older (Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu) – Mayores de 16 años.)

Flu Season Visitor Restriction

Visitors temporarily restricted to age 16 or older

As a safety first organization, Christiana Care is implementing a temporary visitation age restriction starting Friday, Jan. 18. This temporary restriction protects patients, their loved ones and health care workers during this time of extremely high number of influenza cases and other respiratory illnesses circulating in our community.

The new restrictions limit visitors to patients in Christiana and Wilmington hospitals to persons age 16 or older. Children and teens younger than 16 years are most likely to get the flu and remain contagious longer than adults. This restriction does not apply to outpatient and ambulatory services. We began restricting visitors under the age of 16 years in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Women’s and Children’s areas on Jan. 18.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

For more information about the Flu visit our Health Library.


Restricción de visitantes durante la Temporada de Influenza (Flu)

Temporalmente solo se permiten los visitantes mayores de 16 años.

Como una organización que promueve la seguridad ante todo, Christiana Care está implementando una restricción temporal en la edad de visitantes a partir del viernes 18 de enero. Esta restricción temporal protege a los pacientes, a sus seres queridos y al personal de cuidados de salud durante esta época con un número extremadamente alto de casos de influenza y de otras enfermedades respiratorias que circulan en nuestra comunidad.

Las nuevas restricciones, en los hospitales Christiana y Wilmington, sólo permiten visitas a pacientes de personas mayores de 16 años. Los niños y adolescentes menores de 16 años son más propensos a contraer el flu y son contagiosos por más tiempo que los adultos. Esta restricción no aplica a las áreas de servicios ambulatorios. Comenzamos la restricción de visitas a menores de 16 años en nuestra Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales (NICU) y en las áreas para Mujeres y Niños desde el 18 de enero.

Gracias por su comprensión y cooperación.

Para más información sobre la gripe, visite nuestra Biblioteca de Salud.

Women's Health Care

Tailored to you

Caring For Your Baby

A new baby brings joy but also challenges to daily life. We are here to help and make sure you feel confident caring for your baby when you leave the hospital as well as in the weeks, months and years to follow.

Feeding

Choosing how to feed your baby has life-long effects for your baby and for you. What you have seen and learned about infant feeding from your family, friends, and teachers is likely to influence your attitude and perceptions. Whether you definitely plan to breastfeed or you are still unsure, consider the fact that your milk is the best milk for your baby. It is the ideal first food for your baby’s first several months.

Feeding Options

  • Breastfeeding. Nature designed human milk especially for human babies. It has several advantages over any substitute ever developed. Your milk has just the right balance of nutrients, and it has them in a form most easily used by the human baby’s immature body systems. Because it was made for your human baby, your milk is also the most gentle on your baby’s systems.

 

  • Bottle-feeding. If you decide not to breastfeed, or are unable to breastfeed, commercial iron-fortified formulas can provide adequate nutrition for your infant. Infant formulas have enough protein, calories, fat, vitamins, and minerals for growth. However, formula doesn’t have the immune factors that are in breast milk. The immune factors in breast milk can help prevent infections.

Helpful hints for feeding your baby

These are some helpful hints for feeding your baby:

  • Breast milk is best for your baby and is beneficial even if you only breastfeed for a short amount of time, or part-time.
  • Offer cow’s milk-based formula with iron as first choice of formula, if you do not breastfeed.
  • Keep your baby on breast milk or baby formula until he or she is 1-year-old.
  • Start solid foods when your baby can hold up his or her head, sit-up with support, and no longer has tongue thrusting (4 to 6 months).
  • When starting solids, start with rice cereal mixed with breast milk or formula on a spoon. Do not give solids in the bottle or with an infant feeder.
  • Once your baby is tolerating cereal, offer vegetables, then add fruits, and then meats.
  • Ask your child’s healthcare provider about the best way to add new foods to your baby’s diet.
  • Progress in texture of foods so that your baby is eating table foods by his or her first birthday.
  • Do not give honey & foods that can be easily choked on (like hot dogs, peanuts, grapes, raisins, or popcorn) to your child during his or her first year of life.
  • Unless your child is known to have or has severe allergies (for instance, breaking out in hives, vomiting, or having trouble breathing), recent reports and studies have shown that introducing whole eggs and peanut butter at a young age — even at 4 to 6 months — reduces the chance of your child developing allergies to these foods. Talk to your child’s healthcare provider about whether these foods are appropriate for your child.

Mothers Milk Bank

The oldest operating human milk bank in the United States, Christiana Care’s Mothers’ Milk Bank stores, tests and distributes donated mothers’ milk to meet the specific needs of infants for whom human milk is prescribed by physicians.

The Milk Bank also stores and dispenses milk that mothers collect for their own hospitalized newborns. Mothers’ milk is often a gift of life. It is a gift that is generously given by nursing mothers who are willing to share breast milk for which their own infants have no need.

Many babies who receive milk from the Mothers’ Milk Bank would be unable to thrive without it. Babies need donor milk because of:

  • Allergies and formula intolerances.
  • Prematurity.
  • Failure to thrive.
  • Immunological deficiencies.
  • Postoperative nutrition.
  • Inborn errors of metabolism.

At Christiana Care, neonatologists—doctors who are specially trained to care for premature and sick infants—encourage the use of mothers’ milk. Mothers’ milk is the ideal nourishment for a newborn baby because it is easier than formula for the baby to digest, reducing the risk of stomach and intestinal complications. This is most important for any critically ill infant.

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