Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

ChristianaCare

Shortage of Contrast for Imaging Services

Because of a global shortage of iodinated contrast material (Omnipaque) caused by temporary overseas manufacturing disruptions, ChristianaCare is taking steps to preserve supply so that it remains available for the most time-sensitive and urgent patient needs. (Learn more in our frequently asked questions.)

Omnipaque contrast is the most widely used contrast material for CT scans and radiographic examinations at ChristianaCare facilities. It is also used for cardiac imaging and interventions, and in the GI lab, Surgicenter and other settings.

The shortage is expected to last several weeks, and likely into the summer months.

Hospitals and health care organizations worldwide are managing the effects of the shortage and the impact to patient care.

ChristianaCare is making every effort to meet the needs of patients who need this product in their procedures. We are working individually with physicians to prioritize those patients with the most urgent needs.

Wherever possible, we are using alternative contrast material and limiting its use to ensure adequate supplies for time sensitive and emergent exams. It is possible that some elective procedures that use this product will need to be delayed.

ChristianaCare will continue to look for options to minimize disruptions created by the shortage, as we serve our community as expert, caring partners in health.

Learn more in our frequently asked questions (FAQs).

COVID-19: New Visitation Guidelines. Click here for what to expect at ChristianaCare during COVID-19.

Health & Wellness

Assessing Comfort or Pain in an Alzheimer's Patient

While Alzheimer’s disease itself does not cause pain, your loved one may suffer pain from other sources. These sources may include improperly fitting clothes, stomach cramps, constipation, undiscovered sprains or broken bones, arthritis, pressure sores and bruises. Poor hygiene may also lead to pain; for example, sore gums may result from improper oral (teeth/mouth) care.

Assessing pain and comfort becomes more challenging when your loved one is not able use words to tell you what hurts. As your loved one’s ability to speak declines, nonverbal communication becomes more important in conveying signs of pain or discomfort. The following may be signs of discomfort or pain:

  • Sudden worsening of behavior.
  • Moaning or shouting.
  • Increased restlessness.
  • Refusal to do certain routine activities.

These tips may help you in assessing your loved one’s comfort level and managing pain:

  • Pay close attention to your loved one’s facial expressions and body language. For example, if your loved one pulls away from your touch, this may be a sign of pain or discomfort.
  • Use bathing or dressing time to search for sources of pain: bruises, cuts, swelling, redness or other signs of injury.
  • Take all signs of pain seriously, and see a doctor if you are unable to find the source of pain.
  • Your loved one’s doctor may be able to provide a specific pain-management regimen.